How Do Therapists Help with Anxiety

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Anxiety is that gnawing unease and fear that can grip us without warning. It's become an unwelcome guest in the lives of many, often leaving them feeling powerless and overwhelmed. 

But what if there was a path to reclaiming your peace of mind? This is where therapists step into the picture. These skilled professionals have the knowledge and techniques to help untangle the web of anxiety.

They guide us to understanding our fears, managing our symptoms, and ultimately, regaining control over our mental health.

In this article, we will explore how therapists serve as invaluable allies in our battle against anxiety.

Anxiety Therapists in Colorado

Randal Thomas, SWC

Randal Thomas, SWC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 602-1342
Samantha Zavala, LPCC

Samantha Zavala, LPCC

Aurora, Colorado
(719) 345-2424
Jessica Titone, LPCC

Jessica Titone, LPCC

Colorado
(720) 437-9089
Emily Murphy, LPC

Emily Murphy, LPC

Colorado
(719) 345-2424
Donna Janiec, LPC, NCC

Donna Janiec, LPC, NCC

Colorado
(719) 345-2424
Meghan Purcell, LPCC

Meghan Purcell, LPCC

Pueblo, Colorado
(719) 696-3439
Julia Rosales, MA, LPCC

Julia Rosales, MA, LPCC

Aurora, Colorado
(720) 449-4121
Naomi Kettner, LPC, NCC

Naomi Kettner, LPC, NCC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 452-4374
Barbra Styles, LPC, LAC

Barbra Styles, LPC, LAC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 345-2424
Jacquelynne Sils, LPCC

Jacquelynne Sils, LPCC

Colorado
(719) 696-3439
Paitton Callery, LPCC, ATR-P

Paitton Callery, LPCC, ATR-P

Pueblo, Colorado
(719) 696-3439
Laura Brinkman, MA, LPCC

Laura Brinkman, MA, LPCC

Aurora, Colorado
(720) 449-4121
Katherine (Kate) Taylor, MBA, MA, LPC

Katherine (Kate) Taylor, MBA, MA, LPC

Colorado
(719) 345-2424
Shannon Matlock, LPC, NCC

Shannon Matlock, LPC, NCC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 203-7021
Sarah Lawler, LPCC

Sarah Lawler, LPCC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 203-7021


Understanding Anxiety

Anxiety is a natural response to stress or perceived danger, but when it becomes a constant or overwhelming force in a person's life, it may be classified as an anxiety disorder.

These disorders are characterized by excessive fear or anxiety that interferes with daily activities and are among the most common mental health conditions worldwide.

Numerous forms of anxiety disorders exist, including Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), Panic Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Specific Phobias, and Separation Anxiety Disorder. Each type has unique characteristics, but all are marked by persistent, excessive worry in situations that aren't threatening.

Common symptoms of anxiety disorders can vary from person to person but often include feelings of nervousness, restlessness, tension, increased heart rate, hyperventilation, sweating, trembling, feeling weak or tired, trouble concentrating, sleep disturbances, and an inability to control worry.

The impact of these symptoms on daily life can be significant. People suffering from anxiety disorders may avoid places or situations to prevent these feelings, and this avoidance behavior can limit their experiences and restrict their lives.

They may struggle with work or school performance, maintaining relationships, and even carrying out basic daily tasks. 



The Role of a Therapist in Managing Anxiety

Therapists play a pivotal role in managing anxiety and its debilitating effects. They are trained to understand the complexities of anxiety disorders and use evidence-based practices to help individuals cope with their symptoms. 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), for example, is a common approach used by therapists to help people understand and change thought patterns that lead to harmful behaviors or distressing feelings. 

This therapeutic approach involves identifying negative thought cycles and developing healthier and more positive ways to respond to stressors. 

Exposure therapy, another technique often employed, helps patients confront their fears in a safe and controlled environment, gradually reducing anxiety through repeated exposure.

The relationship between a therapist and their client, often referred to as the therapeutic alliance, is of utmost importance when managing anxiety.

This relationship is built on trust, respect, and understanding. It provides a safe space for individuals to express their fears and worries without judgment. The strength of this bond can significantly influence the outcome of therapy.

When clients feel understood and supported by their therapist, they are more likely to engage fully in the therapy process, openly discuss their feelings, and actively participate in implementing coping strategies. 

Thus, fostering a strong therapeutic relationship can be a powerful tool in helping individuals manage their anxiety effectively. 


Different Therapeutic Approaches to Anxiety

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a widely used therapeutic approach for treating anxiety disorders. 

CBT works on the premise that our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are interconnected, and by changing negative thought patterns, we can alter our feelings and behaviors. 

During CBT sessions, the therapist helps the client to identify and challenge their distorted thoughts and beliefs, replacing them with healthier, more balanced ones. 

This process can lead to reduced anxiety, improved mood, and better coping strategies for managing stressors. 

Moreover, the skills learned through CBT have long-term benefits as they can be applied to various life situations.

Exposure Therapy is another effective approach, particularly for phobias and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

In exposure therapy, individuals are gradually and repeatedly exposed to the source of their anxiety in a controlled, safe setting.

The goal is to reduce fear and anxiety through repeated exposure, eventually helping the individual to realize that the anticipated outcomes of the fear stimulus are often exaggerated or unrealistic.

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), a novel therapeutic approach, promotes the acceptance of one's emotions and thoughts instead of battling against them or feeling remorseful for having them.

ACT employs mindfulness and behavioral activation techniques to enhance psychological resilience, thus empowering individuals to take actions aligned with their values, even when confronted with distressing emotions, thoughts, or sensations. 

ACT has been shown to be effective in reducing excessive worry, fear, and avoidance, core symptoms of anxiety disorders.

Lastly, Mindfulness-Based Therapies focus on cultivating a heightened state of awareness of the present moment. 

These therapies help individuals with anxiety disorders to focus less on distressing thoughts about the past or future that can trigger anxiety. Instead, they learn to acknowledge these thoughts without judgment and let them pass without reacting to them.

This can lead to decreased anxiety levels, improved mood, and an overall better quality of life. 



The Process of Therapy for Anxiety

The journey to managing anxiety often begins with an initial consultation. This first session is an opportunity for the therapist to understand the client's experiences, symptoms, and concerns.

It typically involves a detailed discussion about the client's history, current situation, and goals for therapy. The therapist may use specific assessment tools or questionnaires to gauge the severity and type of anxiety disorder.

This session is also a chance for the client to ask questions, understand the therapy process, and get a feel for whether they can build a trusting relationship with the therapist.

Following the initial consultation, the therapist develops an individualized treatment plan tailored to the client's needs and goals.

This plan outlines the therapeutic approaches that will be used, the frequency of sessions, and the expected duration of therapy. It's a roadmap for the therapy process, but it's not set in stone. 

As therapy progresses, the therapist continually assesses the client's progress toward their goals. Adjustments to the treatment plan are made based on these assessments, client feedback, and any new issues that arise.

This flexibility allows therapy to evolve alongside the client, ensuring it remains relevant, effective, and responsive to the client's changing needs and circumstances. 



Conclusion

Therapists play an invaluable role in helping individuals manage and overcome anxiety. They provide a safe, non-judgmental space to explore fears and worries and impart practical tools and strategies to navigate through the challenges of anxiety.

Seeking professional help is a courageous step towards healing and self-improvement.

It's okay to reach out, ask for assistance, and actively work towards enhancing your mental health.

Therapists are there to guide, support, and empower you on your path to recovery. 

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February 25th, 2024

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