How to Control Crying When Mad

Untitled-design---2023-11-29T202725.706


When we experience anger, our bodies often react in a variety of ways - our heart rate increases, our muscles tense up, and sometimes, we may even burst into tears.

This emotional response is a complex interplay between our mind and body, signaling that something has upset our sense of balance or fairness.

Understanding and controlling these emotions is crucial, not just for our personal health, but also for maintaining healthy relationships and effective communication with others.

The ability to manage such intense feelings can prevent situations from escalating, promote rational decision-making, and ultimately lead to better outcomes in both personal and professional scenarios.


Coping Skills Therapists in Colorado

Marie Whatley LPCC

Marie Whatley LPCC

Colorado
(719) 345-2424
Seth Boughton, SWC

Seth Boughton, SWC

Colorado
(720) 449-4121
Melody Reynalds, LPC

Melody Reynalds, LPC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 345-2424
Dominique Schweinhardt, MA, LPCC, LPP

Dominique Schweinhardt, MA, LPCC, LPP

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 602-1342
Noah Suess, MA, LPC

Noah Suess, MA, LPC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 481-3518
Tracey Lundy, LCSW

Tracey Lundy, LCSW

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 452-4374
Sarah Munk, LPC

Sarah Munk, LPC

Colorado
(719) 345-2424
Deja Howard, MSW, SWC

Deja Howard, MSW, SWC

Colorado
(719) 345-2424
Laura Hunt, LPC

Laura Hunt, LPC

Colorado
(719) 452-4374
Sarah Webster, SWC

Sarah Webster, SWC

Colorado
(719) 696-3439

Get Matched to the Right Provider

Complete this questionnaire to discover service providers that match your requirements! No need to provide contact information.


Get Matched


Understanding Why We Cry When We're Angry

Crying when angry is a complex emotional response that intertwines physiological and psychological elements.

At the heart of this phenomenon lies the human body's fight-or-flight response, an evolutionary mechanism designed to protect us from threats.

When we get angry, our bodies often interpret this as a sign of danger, triggering hormonal changes that can lead to tears.

This response can be particularly pronounced if we feel powerless or unable to express our anger effectively.

From a psychological perspective, crying during anger can serve as a form of communication.

Tears can signal to others that we are in distress, prompting them to respond with empathy or assistance.

Moreover, crying can also act as a safety valve, allowing us to release pent-up emotions and stress.

In essence, it's a way for our minds to cope with intense feelings and regain emotional equilibrium.



The Impact of Crying When Angry

In the realm of personal relationships, crying when angry can have varying effects. On one hand, it may prompt understanding and compassion from loved ones, fostering deeper emotional connections.

It can act as a non-verbal cue that communicates vulnerability, a need for support, or a desire for conflict resolution.

However, on the other hand, if it occurs frequently, it may also lead to misunderstandings or frustrations, potentially straining relationships. Loved ones might feel overwhelmed or unsure about how to respond, especially if the tears seem out of proportion to the situation at hand.

In professional interactions, the impact of crying when angry can be quite different. While workplaces are slowly becoming more accepting of emotional expression, crying, especially when associated with anger, is often still seen as a sign of weakness or lack of control.

It can potentially affect one's professional image and may even influence others' perceptions of competence and credibility.

That being said, it's important to note that everyone has different emotional responses, and understanding this diversity can contribute to a more empathetic and inclusive workplace environment.


Techniques to Control Crying When Angry

A. Deep Breathing Exercises

One of the most effective ways to control crying when angry is through deep breathing exercises.

This technique involves taking slow, deep breaths, which can help calm your nervous system and reduce emotional intensity.

When you're feeling angry, try this: Inhale deeply through your nose for a count of four, hold your breath for a count of seven, and then exhale slowly through your mouth for a count of eight.

Repeat this cycle several times until you start feeling calmer. Research has shown that deep breathing can significantly reduce feelings of stress and anxiety, which often accompany anger.

B. Mindfulness and Meditation

Mindfulness is another powerful tool that can help manage emotions. It's the practice of staying present and fully engaged with what we're doing at the moment, free from judgment or distraction.

By focusing on the here and now, mindfulness can help us stay grounded during emotionally charged moments.

A simple mindfulness meditation practice to start with is observing your breath. Just sit quietly and focus on your breath as it goes in and out.

If your mind begins to wander, gently bring it back to your breath. Studies have found that regular mindfulness practice can improve emotional regulation and reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression.

C. Cognitive Behavioral Techniques

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a type of psychotherapy that can be very effective in managing crying when angry.

CBT involves identifying negative thought patterns that contribute to emotional distress and working to change them.

For instance, if you tend to cry when you're angry because you believe you're powerless, CBT can help you challenge this belief and develop a more balanced perspective.

While CBT is typically conducted with a therapist, there are also many self-help resources available that teach CBT techniques. 



Seeking Professional Help

While everyone has moments of heightened emotion, if you find that your reactions are consistently intense, difficult to control, or negatively impacting your daily life and relationships, it might be time to consider professional help.

This could include situations where you avoid certain situations for fear of becoming angry and crying, or if you're feeling constantly on edge, anxious, or depressed.

There's no shame in seeking help. It's a proactive step towards better understanding and managing your emotions.

There are several types of therapies and treatments available to help manage crying when angry.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), as mentioned earlier, can be particularly effective. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is another option that combines CBT techniques with mindfulness strategies.

In some cases, medication may be recommended as part of a comprehensive treatment plan.

It's important to work with a healthcare provider to determine the best approach for your specific needs.

They can provide a safe space to explore your feelings, identify triggers, and develop effective coping strategies. 


Get Matched to the Right Provider

Complete this questionnaire to discover service providers that match your requirements! No need to provide contact information.


Get Matched


Conclusion

Managing emotional responses, specifically controlling crying when angry, is a crucial aspect of emotional health and interpersonal relationships.

The strategies discussed - deep breathing exercises, mindfulness and meditation, and cognitive behavioral techniques - are all practical tools that can help in effectively dealing with these intense emotions.

It's perfectly normal to seek assistance in this journey. Don't hesitate to try out these suggested techniques and observe how they work for you. If your emotions continue to feel overwhelming, seeking professional help is a strong and beneficial step forward.

Your mental health matters and there are resources and professionals ready to provide the support you need


×
Stay Informed

When you subscribe to the blog, we will send you an e-mail when there are new updates on the site so you wouldn't miss them.

Related Posts

 

Comments

No comments made yet. Be the first to submit a comment
Already Registered? Login Here
July 14th, 2024

overcomers counseling logo

Explore local counseling and psychiatry services to find the tailored support you require. Embark on a journey towards resilience and become an Overcomer with the right professional assistance by your side!

Contact Us

5585 Erindale Dr. Ste 204
Colorado Springs, CO 80918 mailing
(719) 345-2424 office
(719) 888-5022 text
(855) 719-2549 fax

Business Hours (Provider's hours may vary)

 Sunday   Closed
 Monday   8:00am - 5:00pm
 Tuesday   8:00am - 5:00pm
 Wednesday    8:00am - 5:00pm
 Thursday   8:00am - 5:00pm
 Friday   8:00am - 5:00pm
 Saturday  Closed