Guided Meditation for Anxiety and Panic Attacks

Guided Meditation for Anxiety and Panic Attacks

There are many benefits to learning and practicing guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks.

Anxiety and panic attacks can strike at any time, for no apparent or rational reason.

Anxiety and panic attacks often cause mental, emotional, and physical pain.

Nobody knows for certain what causes them, but guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks is a proven means of regaining focus and peace.

In this article, we will explore different ways use you use guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks to improve your overall psychological health.

For further help in designing your own personal guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks, seek the guidance of a licensed professional counselor. 

Available Anxiety Counselors

Chelsea Bruntmyer, MA, LPCC, NCC

We can find it in ourselves to overcome!

, Colorado

(719) 696-3439

Kelly Bergstedt, MSN, APRN, PMHNP-BC

The first step is the most difficult.

, Colorado

(720) 449-4121

David Geldert MSN, PMHNP-BC

I want you to feel heard and supported.

, Colorado

(720) 449-4121

Guided Meditation for Anxiety and Panic Attacks: Mantra Meditation

Establishing a unique, personal mantra is an important part of guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks.

A mantra is a word or phrase you can repeat during guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks.

Your mantra will help release your mind from fears or worries created by anxiety and panic attacks.

With this in mind, your mantra should be as unique as you are.

A vital part of guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks is using your mantra to remind you there is a safe place to be.

Your mantra may recall a pleasant, comforting memory or remind you to feel blessed.

Remember, guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks is about escaping that overwhelming sense of feeling trapped.

Think of a mantra as a hammock. Repeating your mantra helps you lay back, relax and stop worrying about falling.

Guided Meditation for Anxiety and Panic Attacks: Body Scan

Many who suffer from anxiety and panic attacks feel severe physical discomfort.

You may feel detached from your body, have a loss of physical control, and even numbness.

Performing a body scan is often an effective means of guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks.

A meditative body scan uses your five senses: taste, touch, smell, hearing, and sight.

Guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks is about restoring yourself to your body.

It's about getting back in touch with yourself.

Find a quiet, calming place where you can sit still.

Now, take inventory of your five senses.

Focus on different parts of your body: your toes, fingers, etc.

What do you see, smell, touch, taste, or hear?

Reach out and touch the grass. Listen for birdsong. Smell food cooking.

Many who suffer from anxiety and panic attacks feel abandoned by their physical bodies.

A meditative body scan can help you restore your sense of self, and make you feel more grounded.

Reminding yourself that you are whole and connected with the physical world around you is a vital part of guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks.

Guided Meditation for Anxiety and Panic Attacks: Breathing

Breath is life, and breathing makes you feel alive, alert, and healthy.

As with any form of meditation, yoga, or exercise, breathing is a crucial part of guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks.

There are various breathing methods you may use during guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks.

Mindful breathing is when you lie down or recline in a comfortable position and just breathe.

Don't try to control or alter your breathing- just breathe naturally and pay attention to your body.

Square breathing is when you breathe in deeply and hold it for a few seconds.

This allows your physical body to experience the full, healthful benefits of fresh air.

Lengthening your breathing is when you breathe in deeply, then exhale slowly.

It may be helpful to make an "O" with your mouth or hum a sound while you exhale.

Belly breathing is when you lie on your back and place your hand on your belly.

Breathe in deeply then exhale slowly, tracing your breath with your hand.

This may mean moving your hand slowly along with your breath, up your belly and chest.

Breathing during guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks energizes and enervates your physical body.

Remember, your mind and body are inextricably intertwined- they benefit each other.

Discover what kind of breathing during guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks will help you the most.

Guided Meditation for Anxiety and Panic Attacks: Tactile Meditation

Tactile meditation is an important part of guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks.

Tactile meditation is when you use your sense of touch to reconnect with and ground yourself.

Those who suffer from anxiety and panic attacks know that often you feel like a prisoner within your own mind and body.

A crucial part of practicing guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks is feeling connected to the earth and to the universe.

Remind yourself that you are here, present, and part of something bigger than yourself.

Try finger painting, playing with toys, sewing, etc.

Tactile meditation includes any creative activity where you touch or feel something besides yourself.

But remember, tactile meditation doesn't have to have a purpose or produce anything.

Swimming or even walking barefoot in the grass can be an effective way to practice tactile meditation during guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks.

Whatever makes you feel connected with the physical world, can make you feel inner peace.

Guided Meditation for Anxiety and Panic Attacks: Walking Meditation

Walking meditation is a form of guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks.

Walking meditation may include such activities as hiking, a casual stroll, jogging, or running.

In fact, next time it rains, take walk in the rain- forget the umbrella and raincoat.

With walking meditation, try not to think about your breathing as much.

Pay attention to the rhythm of your steps, and how your feet carry you forward.

Instead of walking with a purpose to get somewhere, try meandering- just walking without a destination. See where it takes you.

Conclusion

You don't have to be an expert at meditation to reap the benefits of guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks.

However, discovering your own unique, individual routine during guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks may be easier with help of a licensed, professional counselor.

A professional anxiety counselor can personally help you through a guided meditation for anxiety and panic attacks.

There is health, and there is hope.

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