Ways You Can Make Bullying Worse for Your Child

Ways You Can Make Bullying Worse for Your Child

Dealing with bullying can be difficult for both parents and their children.

It is important to offer your child support and guide the mental well-being of your child.

Acting on your instinctive response could make bullying worse for your child.

A child might struggle to tell their parents when they are being bullied.

This is why watching out for the warning signs your child might be bullied is vital.

The warning sign could vary depending on your child.

You can make bullying worse for your child when you dismiss the act of bullying.

If your child could tell you about getting bullied, try to avoid downplaying your child's experience.

It is essential to pay attention to your child's experience.

Another way to make bullying worse for your child is to overreact.

Rather than listening to your child and taking calm steps to resolve bullying, some parents overreact.

This might lead you to focus on areas that don't help your child.

Find acts that make bullying worse for your child below:

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Missing the Warning Signs

Often parents are surprised to find out their children are being bullied.

It is normal for some children to be too embarrassed to share being bullied.

This is why you should be watchful of the warning signs of bullying a child.

Your child might just complain about school but pay attention to the complaints.

Closely observe your child's emotional state.

Also, look out for physical signs like unexplained bruises, fear of school, and a drop in academic performance.

Bullying can come from different sources.

This could be other children or friends.

Bullying can also be online through text, social media, and other platforms.

Bullying can have long-term harm to your child.

To address bullying, you first have to be aware your child is bullied.

Missing the warning Signs is one of the ways you can make bullying worse for your child.

Dismissing the Bullying 

In the instance your child informs you of being bullied, or you become aware of bullying, dismissing the bully will only make bullying worse.

Instead, take more practical steps to intervene in the bullying.

Try to resist the urge to dismiss bullying of your child.

It might be tempting to refer to your personal experience to determine what bullying is.

However, your child's experience is different from yours.

Also, reconsider telling your child just to ignore bullying.

Bullying generally doesn't go away when you ignore it.

You might need to take active steps towards that goal to protect your child from bullying.

It is imperative not to dismiss your child's bullying.

When you dismiss your child's bullying, your child might not be comfortable sharing other acts of bullying.

This could also make your child more isolated.

Overreacting 

It is necessary to manage your emotions after finding out your child is being bullied.

As an adult, try to maintain a calm state.

You will likely make bullying worse for your child when you overreact.

One of the first things to do is collect as much information as possible.

Listen attentively to your child.

Then form an action plan to resolve the bullying.

It is necessary to have all the facts if you want to discuss them with a school teacher.

Be sure to know the extent of your child's involvement.

If you act quickly, you might tackle the wrong issues.

Try to be calm when speaking to a teacher or school authorities.

Remember, the teachers also owe a duty to the bully.

Instead, make reasonable demands in the interest of your child.

Retaliating Against the Bully

Feeling infuriated at the mention of your child being bullied is normal.

However, it is important to remember to keep your emotions in check.

Retaliating against another child will seem petty and might even make bullying worse for your child.

A common reaction from parents is to resort to verbal abuse or gossip about the bully or the bully's family.

Try to remember you are a role model to your child.

Address the bullying by reporting it to the appropriate authorities.

When you retaliate against the bully, further retaliation will likely be directed at your child.

This could lead to a negative escalation of the entire situation where your child's needs are neglected.

It is also possible that the bully will be able to play the victim at the expense of your child.

Retaliation against the bully will also expose you to legal risks.

Try to manage your feelings and develop a plan.

A plan that prioritizes your child will be more helpful.

Not Supporting Your Child

In times of bullying, your child needs your support the most.

Yet, often parents get swept up in other things like revenge or anger.

Not supporting your Child's side will make bullying worse for your child.

Focusing on the bully will not help your child.

You should focus on your child rather than obsessing with the bully or engaging in arguments with the school.

Reassure and support your child.

When you focus on your child, you can teach your child how to handle instances of bullying.

You can teach your child to be more confident in themselves.

Concentrating on your child will allow you to know the extent of support your child needs.

It is important to take time to take your child's side.

This will help your child deal with bullying.

You also might have to get your child support from a counselor or therapist.

Conclusion

Bullying can hurt the physical and mental well-being of your child.

It is essential to offer your child support when dealing with bullying.

You can make bullying worse for your child when you miss the warning signs, dismiss the bullying, overreact, retaliate against the bully, or don't support your child.

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November 26th, 2022

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