Types of Therapy for Bipolar Disorder

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Bipolar disorder, characterized by erratic mood fluctuations, poses unique challenges for those who experience it.

These mood shifts can significantly affect one's daily life and ability to function well.

However, through effective treatment and unwavering support for bipolar disorder, individuals can discover a pathway to stability.

Therapy can help bipolar people manage stress caused by external factors, enhancing their relationships and coping with symptoms.

There are various forms of therapy for bipolar disorder that have proven to be effective for the condition.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is a type of therapy for bipolar disorder that helps people with bipolar disorder understand and manage the thoughts and behaviors that contribute to the condition.

With CBT, bipolar people can learn to develop coping strategies, boost self-esteem, and enhance problem-solving skills.

Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy is also a form of therapy for bipolar disorder.

It is a distinctive therapy that focuses on establishing consistent daily schedules while encouraging healthy social connections.

Family-Focused Therapy (FFT) is a form of therapy that recognizes the essential role of family members in treating bipolar disorder.

Below are more details on the different types of therapy for bipolar disorder.

Bipolar Disorder Therapists in Colorado

Mallory Heise, LPC, LAC

Mallory Heise, LPC, LAC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 602-1342
Amber Hopf, MSW, SWP

Amber Hopf, MSW, SWP

Colorado
(719) 602-1342
Alex Wiley, LPC

Alex Wiley, LPC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 452-4374
Katherine Miller, LPCC

Katherine Miller, LPCC

Colorado
(720) 449-4121
Michele Ames-Hodges, PsyD, LPC

Michele Ames-Hodges, PsyD, LPC

Colorado
(719) 345-2424
Seth Boughton, SWC

Seth Boughton, SWC

Aurora, Colorado
(720) 449-4121
Samantha Zavala, LPCC

Samantha Zavala, LPCC

Aurora, Colorado
(719) 345-2424
Vanessa Curran, LPCC

Vanessa Curran, LPCC

Colorado
(719) 345-2424
Heather Comensky, LPC

Heather Comensky, LPC

Aurora, Colorado
(720) 449-4121
Vanessa Dewitt, LCSW

Vanessa Dewitt, LCSW

Pueblo, Colorado
(719) 696-3439

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a psychotherapy technique that can help a bipolar person learn how to manage the condition better.

This form of therapy focuses on the interconnectedness of a person's thoughts, emotions, and actions.

Usually, in these types of therapy sessions, there is an interaction between the bipolar person and the therapist.

In some other forms of this therapy, you can have group sessions where people with similar issues come together to discuss with a therapist.

CBT helps individuals recognize negative thoughts and thinking patterns and encourages them to practice more adaptive ways of thinking.

CBT aims to recognize thoughts that cause emotional distress and prompt negative behavior.

For instance, if you constantly feel that others are judging you, it can cause social anxiety.

It may result in you avoiding social situations, preventing you from forming relationships and receiving social support.

In order to work towards challenging these negative thoughts, you have to be aware that they are negative thoughts. 

Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy

Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy is a unique therapy that aims to establish consistency in daily routines and promote positive social connections.

IPSRT stresses the significance of maintaining consistent sleep schedules, dietary habits, and physical activity routines.

The process involves maintaining a daily log of one's bedtime, wake time, and activities and monitoring how changes in these patterns impact their emotional state or well-being.

This therapy involves regulating daily routines and sleep-wake cycles to stabilize moods.

In this case, the bipolar individual and their therapist work to pinpoint one or more areas of interpersonal difficulty (such as conflicts with friends) and explore potential solutions to avoid similar issues in the future.

Studies have shown that IPSRT has the potential to decrease symptoms of depression and enhance social capabilities, enabling people to live more satisfying lives.

Family-Focused Therapy

Family-focused therapy (FFT) is a combination of two psychotherapeutic methods.

It involves a mix of family therapy as well as psychoeducation.

However, in this sort of therapy, the major objective is to teach patients and their families about the nature of their condition.

Family therapy treatments differ from other forms of therapy in that they focus on family dynamics and relationships; since both can positively or negatively impact the condition.

FFT usually consists of the Bipolar patient as well as any parents, spouses, or other family members.

A single therapist normally provides it, and lasts for a duration of 12 sessions based on the needs of the family in question.

The early aspects of the sessions concentrate on educating patients about the disorder, including its causes, symptoms, and how they cycle over time, and early warning signals of new episodes.

This also extends to teaching them what to do as a family to stop the episodes from worsening.

Later sessions emphasize problem-solving and communication techniques, particularly for handling family problems,

Bipolar Disorder Therapists in Colorado

Bipolar Disorder Therapists in Colorado

Mallory Heise, LPC, LAC

Mallory Heise, LPC, LAC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 602-1342
Amber Hopf, MSW, SWP

Amber Hopf, MSW, SWP

Colorado
(719) 602-1342
Alex Wiley, LPC

Alex Wiley, LPC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 452-4374
Katherine Miller, LPCC

Katherine Miller, LPCC

Colorado
(720) 449-4121
Michele Ames-Hodges, PsyD, LPC

Michele Ames-Hodges, PsyD, LPC

Colorado
(719) 345-2424
Seth Boughton, SWC

Seth Boughton, SWC

Aurora, Colorado
(720) 449-4121
Samantha Zavala, LPCC

Samantha Zavala, LPCC

Aurora, Colorado
(719) 345-2424
Vanessa Curran, LPCC

Vanessa Curran, LPCC

Colorado
(719) 345-2424
Heather Comensky, LPC

Heather Comensky, LPC

Aurora, Colorado
(720) 449-4121
Vanessa Dewitt, LCSW

Vanessa Dewitt, LCSW

Pueblo, Colorado
(719) 696-3439

Dialectical Behavior Therapy

Dialectical behavior therapy is a type of psychotherapy that originates from cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).

DBT is based on CBT; however, it focuses more on the psychosocial aspect of treatment.

DBT consists of three different therapeutic settings.

These settings include weekly group DBT skills sessions, weekly individual psychotherapy sessions, and phone coaching.

The Dialectical behavior therapy group skills sessions cover various modules in four areas, which are focusing skills, crisis survival skills, de-escalation skills, and relationship/people skills.

During individual therapy sessions, the individual receives personalized attention to review the skills they learned in the group sessions.

It allows a person to delve deeper into how well they have been able to use their skills during the week and pinpoint any areas that require more focus.

Group Psychoeducation

Group psychoeducation is another type of therapy for bipolar disorder.

This involves bipolar people gathering as a group, often in the presence of their loved ones, and led by a group leader who may be a psychologist or a peer mental health counselor with proper training.

Certain psychoeducation groups often have a well-defined structure and focus on providing education and training in specific skills.

In other instances, some platforms are created to provide a means for bipolar people to come together and share personal experiences.

These platforms also provide a supportive environment for them to share and receive advice and support from those with similar circumstances.

Support groups offered by organizations like NAMI can be very helpful for individuals struggling with mental illness by reducing the sense of isolation that often accompanies such conditions. 

Conclusion

The majority of people with bipolar disorder will require antipsychotic or mood-stabilizing medication; however, to enhance the individual's functioning, therapy for bipolar disorder is a beneficial addition.

Here are some types of bipolar disorder cognitive behavioral therapy, family-focused therapy, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, and group psychoeducation.

These therapies provide valuable tools for self-reflection, personal growth, and connection with others.

Resources 

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April 15th, 2024

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