Early Signs to Identify Mania

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It is not uncommon for people experiencing mania to feel as though they are pulsating with an abnormally high level of energy and ideas.

Understanding the precursors to mania can aid in its successful management.

People don't typically seek treatment for the early warning signs of mania, which are often labeled hypomania and frequently cause feelings of euphoria.

However, this is exactly the phase of a manic episode that requires early intervention.

Family and friends can be very instrumental in providing support for bipolar disorder when you are experiencing early signs.

The earlier you act, the better your chances are of preventing a full-blown mood episode.

A sudden increase in energy and activity levels is one of the first signs to identify mania.

While this surge in energy and activity levels can lead to an increase in productivity, it can also result in burnout, which can trigger mania.

One of the other early signs to identify mania is when you can function normally on only very few hours of sleep but still feel alert.

People experiencing mania may feel like they don't need as much sleep as usual and may go days without sleeping.

This will increase fatigue and irritability, which are telltale signs of an impending mania episode.

Early signs to identify mania include elevated moods.

While an upbeat mood may appear to be positive, it can quickly devolve into impulsivity and recklessness, which are also early signs of mania.

Below are detailed more on early signs to identify mania. 

Bipolar Disorder Therapists in Colorado

Noah Suess, MA, LPC

Noah Suess, MA, LPC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 481-3518
Samantha Zavala, LPCC

Samantha Zavala, LPCC

Aurora, Colorado
(719) 345-2424
Katherine Miller, LPCC

Katherine Miller, LPCC

Colorado
(720) 449-4121
Leigh Harlan, LPC

Leigh Harlan, LPC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 602-1342
Shannon Matlock, LPC, NCC

Shannon Matlock, LPC, NCC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 203-7021
Heather Comensky, LPC

Heather Comensky, LPC

Aurora, Colorado
(720) 449-4121
Megan Brausam, LPC

Megan Brausam, LPC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 481-3518
Laura Hunt, LPC

Laura Hunt, LPC

Colorado
(719) 452-4374
Mallory Heise, LPC, LAC

Mallory Heise, LPC, LAC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 602-1342
Shannon Hamm, LPC, CCTP

Shannon Hamm, LPC, CCTP

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 452-4374

Increased Energy and Activity

Mania is frequently associated with an increase in energy and activity.

Research has found that increased energy and activity levels are hallmark symptoms of mania.

Bipolar people may feel restless, fidgety, or agitated, and they may be able to engage in goal-directed activities for hours on end without becoming tired.

This can lead to increased productivity, but it can also lead to burnout and physical exhaustion.

People with mania, in some instances, may have increased energy to the extent that it is hard to stick to one task, and they bounce around from one idea to the next.

In the end, they begin so many different endeavors but rarely see them through to fruition.

Bipolar people are more active during manic episodes than they are when their mood stabilizes, and it is crucial that you notice these early signs when they occur.

Furthermore, studies have also found that bipolar people are more active overall than people without the condition, even when they are not experiencing symptoms.

Elevated Mood

When people come out of a prolonged depressive episode, mania can seem enjoyable because of the euphoria that often accompanies it.

This feeling on its own is not dangerous but is a good indicator that mania is setting in.

Bipolar people experiencing the onset of a mania episode may experience abnormally elevated levels of elation, excitement, and optimism.

They might say things like, "I feel on top of the world," or "I feel invincible." An optimistic outlook can be deceptive, as it often leads to hasty and unsafe decisions.

Research on the effects of manic episodes on the brain has shown that the areas of the brain that control emotion and mood are overactive during these episodes.

This can explain the feelings of exhilaration or euphoria that bipolar people often experience. 

Impulsivity

Research has shown that impulsivity is a hallmark of bipolar disorder and that it is significantly more prevalent during manic episodes than depressive ones.

Imaging studies of the brain have shown that the prefrontal cortex and other regions involved in impulse control are less active in people experiencing mania.

Manic episodes may be accompanied by increased risk-taking due to decreased activity in the prefrontal cortex, which can cause impulsivity and a lack of inhibition.

This makes impulsivity one of the early signs needed to identify mania, and it can manifest in various ways.

Impulsivity in bipolar people is more likely to be displayed through impulsive spending, which can lead them into significant debt.

Some others may engage in sexually risky behavior on the spur of the moment, such as engaging in unprotected sex or having multiple sexual partners.

In other cases, bipolar people often exhibit impulsivity in the form of substance abuse during manic episodes.

Certainly, it is essential to always look out for the early signs in order to manage impulsivity effectively.

This can be achieved with the use of medication, therapy, and behavioral modifications.

Bipolar Disorder Therapists in Colorado

Bipolar Disorder Therapists in Colorado

Noah Suess, MA, LPC

Noah Suess, MA, LPC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 481-3518
Samantha Zavala, LPCC

Samantha Zavala, LPCC

Aurora, Colorado
(719) 345-2424
Katherine Miller, LPCC

Katherine Miller, LPCC

Colorado
(720) 449-4121
Leigh Harlan, LPC

Leigh Harlan, LPC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 602-1342
Shannon Matlock, LPC, NCC

Shannon Matlock, LPC, NCC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 203-7021
Heather Comensky, LPC

Heather Comensky, LPC

Aurora, Colorado
(720) 449-4121
Megan Brausam, LPC

Megan Brausam, LPC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 481-3518
Laura Hunt, LPC

Laura Hunt, LPC

Colorado
(719) 452-4374
Mallory Heise, LPC, LAC

Mallory Heise, LPC, LAC

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 602-1342
Shannon Hamm, LPC, CCTP

Shannon Hamm, LPC, CCTP

Colorado Springs, Colorado
(719) 452-4374

Racing Thoughts

If you know what it's like to have thoughts that seem to be moving at a hundred miles per hour, you can relate to the feeling of a racing mind.

On the other hand, for people experiencing or about to experience mania, one of the early signs is evident in racing thoughts.

Mania is frequently characterized by racing thoughts, which can have a significant impact on one's daily life.

People with mania may have difficulty concentrating on tasks, resulting in decreased productivity and increased frustration.

They may also have trouble sleeping, as their racing thoughts make it difficult to calm their mind and relax.

Once you notice this feeling and how it affects you, it is essential that you implement an action plan to minimize the effects of the impending mania.

Reduced Need for Sleep Or Rest

For bipolar people, a decreased need for sleep is a common warning sign of the onset or pending mania episode.

If you are experiencing mania symptoms, it is critical to recognize the signs of a decreased need for sleep and seek bipolar disorder treatment.

These signs can include being active even when you have barely slept or maybe feeling like you don't even need to sleep at all.

The consequences of a reduced need for sleep can be severe. It can cause fatigue, irritability, and poor concentration, making it difficult to complete daily tasks.

It can even lead to psychosis in severe cases, where a person may experience delusions or hallucinations.

Conclusion

Remember that not everyone will experience the same symptoms. You might experience none, a few, or all of these.

Understanding one's own personality, starting point, and typical manic symptoms is crucial because everyone is unique.

To manage episodes, you need to recognize the symptoms of mania early on in order to receive support for bipolar disorder.

Some early signs to identify mania include increased energy and activity, elevated mood, impulsivity, racing thoughts, and reduced need for sleep or rest. 

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July 14th, 2024

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